The Things We Say: through a glass darkly

It’s funny how we repeat phrases often without thinking of where they came from or the context of the meaning. I noticed one such phrase recently

through a glass darkly“.

I had suggested to a reading group at BookLikes.com that we should read a book series called:

withintheglassdarklyWITHIN THE GLASS DARKLY by William Gareth Evans published in 2010.

It’s a Gothic tale based on characters introduced in 1872 by the author Joseph. T. Sheridan Le Fanu in his novella Carmilla which was included in his short story volume named In A Glass Darkly.

indexWhile searching for the original short story volume, so that I could read the story that inspired William and other authors, (even Bram Stoker’s Dracula was inspired by the story Carmilla),

I came across another novel Through A Glass Darkly by Karleen Koen an historical fiction published in 2003.

In A Glass Darkly is also a short story written by Agatha Christieregatta_mystery – first published in 1939 by our favorite sleuth author

and now available in a collection, The Regatta Mystery and other stories .

I was curious of what else would turn up referencing glass darkly . . .

A few more strokes of the keys and I discovered poetry regarding this phrase as well. THROUGH A GLASS, DARKLY is a poem by Gen. George S. Patton, Jr. which you can read by clicking the link.

throughglassdarklyfilmThere was also a well received movie Through A Glass Darkly made in 1961

Directed by Ingmar Bergman, famous for his close up shots without movement of any  kind to magnify the intensity the character’s emotions, as well as the famous double face shot of two characters looking in opposite directions and never meeting each others POV unable to communicate or understand each other.

This is all heavy stuff and with so many people inspired through the ages, and in various art forms,  I decided to get to the crux of the matter.

Glass darkly is a term coined for a mirror.

mirrorMirrors have been around in one form or another for ages. Long ago people used a metal base like bronze to see their reflection and had to polish the metal vigilantly. Later forms were layered with glass tiles on top, but still the image was dark, thus glass darkly. Learn more about the history of mirrors here: The History of Mirror: Through A Glass, Darkly

The term was even referenced in the Bible, yes that long ago . . .

For now we see through a glass, darkly; but then face to face: now I know in part; but then shall I know even as also I am known.  And now stays faith, hope, charity, these three; but the greatest of these is charity.

(1 Corinthians 13: 12-13)

Who knew!

EZIndiebutton2  Keep Reading – Keep Writing!

More Info:

Indie Wire The Essentials: The 15 Greatest Ingmar Bergman Films

through-a-glass-darkly“Through A Glass Darkly” (1961)

A slow and painful disintegration of a family vacationing at a summer home on the island of Fårö trying to cope with the deteriorating mental state of the family’s eldest daughter Karin who has suffered a nervous breakdown.

 

Within My World – Dracula, the musical

The musical is by Gareth Evans and Christopher J. Orton, with orchestrations by the noted British composer and producer, Ian Lynn.

4 thoughts on “The Things We Say: through a glass darkly

    1. I was happy to discover Agatha Christie’s short story too, and also find Carmilla and other short stories by J.T. Sheridan Le Fanu – I plan on reading his work this weekend; he seems to be the authentic Gothic writer.

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    1. It was inspiring to read about how the screenplay was filmed – the focus on the character. Some writers concentrate on plot and others on the character development, but no one speaks about capturing ‘that moment’ and the intense pivot to the character at a moment via in our writing. In literary works some have tried but for the most part, I think we tend to keep things moving, so maybe this is a technique best left for the big screen. We can play and try it out 🙂

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